Object

Title: Equilibrium and non-equilibrium freezing of water in clay-water systems

Creator:

Kozłowski, Tomasz

Date:

2009

Resource Type:

artykuł

Group publication title:

CEER, nr 3 (2009)

Abstract:

The temperature of spontaneous nucleation Tsn and the equilibrium freezing point Tf were determined for six monomineral, homoionic clayey soils by use of the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) technique. The temperature of spontaneous nucleation Tsn was determined on the cooling run, as the initial temperature of the observed exothermic peak. The temperature of equilibrium freezing (or melting) Tf was comprehended as the initial temperature of the last non-zero thermal impulse in the diagram of real thermal impulses distribution q(T) obtained on warming.The supercooling was calculated as the difference between Tf and Tsn. ; The obtained results testify the strong dependency of the equilibrium freezing point Tf on the water content w. It has been proved that Tf can be expressed as a power function of water content wand the limit of plasticity with a high correlation coefficient (R=0.933) showing a good fit to the experimental data. In contrary, a scatter of results was observed for Tsn and [...], which could be related to the effect of factors other than the water content. The diagrams of the supercooling vs. the water content suggest a relationship with an extreme. The critical water content, Wcr at which the supercooling reaches a maximum, was found by use of a quadratic empirical model. For all the clay-water systems, the criitical water content Wcr occurs between the plastic limit Wp and the liquid limit W_L.'

Description:

tytuł dodatkowy: Prace z Inżynierii Lądowej i Środowiska

Publisher:

Zielona Góra: Oficyna Wydawnicza Uniwersytetu Zielonogórskiego

Contributor:

Świtka, Romuald - red.

Format:

application/pdf

Pages:

77-91

Source:

Civil and Environmental Engineering Reports (CEER), No 3

Language:

eng

Rights:

Biblioteka Uniwersytetu Zielonogórskiego

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